. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Tapscott-Kennington Butterfly

TAPSCOTT

The name Tapscott originated on the border of Devon with Somerset.  Opinion is divided as to the meaning of the name, with two main opinions.  One interpretation, and the one to which I subscribe, is that it is a contraction of the Anglo Saxon words 'att aespe cot' meaning (dweller) at aspen cottage. There is a well known and documented process in the evolution of words, including names, known as metathesis, whereby letter-sounds become transposed. In this way, 't asp cot became 't aps cot and thus, Tapscott.

There are three main Tapscott areas of occupation where nearby families are presumably all connected. These are in the villages around Culmstock, Devon, South Molton, Devon and Minehead, Somerset, with a rash of individuals and families spread throughout the two counties.

This is the other interpretation as shown on the Surname database website:

This interesting and most unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from some minor, unrecorded or now "lost" place, believed to have been situated in Devonshire, because of the large number of early recordings in that region. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century elements "Taeppa", an Olde English personal name, of obscure origin, but thought to be a nickname for a tall, thin person, from the Olde English word "taeppa", originally meaning a peg, later a tap; and the Olde English "-cot, cote", a cottage, or shelter for animals, especially sheep. An estimated seven to ten thousand villages and hamlets are known to have disappeared since the 12th Century, due to such natural causes as the Black Death of 1348, in which an eighth of the population perished, and to the widespread practice of enforced clearing and enclosure of rural lands for sheep pastures, from the 15th Century onwards. Early examples include the marriage of Agnes Tapscotte and Peter Chilcotte on November 27th 1591 at Bishops Nympton, Devonshire; the marriage of John Tapscott and Agnes Tossell on July 7th 1606, at Rose Ash, Devonshire; the marriage of Willielmus Tapscott to Aliciam Harper on September 26th 1667 at St. Martin in the Fields, Westminster, London; and the marriage of Edward Tapscut and Parnell Hanson at St. Katherine by the Tower, London, on December 12th 1697. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Dorothy Tapscott, which was dated April 27th 1556, marriage to Thomas Muxwerthie, at North Molton, in Devonshire, during the reign of Queen Mary, known as "Bloody Mary", 1553 - 1558. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
© Copyright: Name Orgin Research surname database 1980 - 2009


KENNINGTON 

The Angles, Saxons, and Jutes began to invade the British Isles in 449 AD, from Denmark and the coast of Germany and Holland. The place-name suffix ‘ing’, from the early Anglo Saxon ‘ingas’ usually refers to the family, (tribe, followers) of a named person, (Cena, in this case) living in that ‘tun’ or manor (farmstead, estate, village).   One would assume in the case of Kennington, that people with that name are descended from the early dwellers in Cena's farm or village.

However, in this case, the surname database disagrees:

This famous surname recorded in the modern spellings of Kennington, Kenington, and Kensington, is of Olde English pre 7th century origins. It derives from one of probably four such places in Berkshire, Kent, Middlesex, and Surrey, all of whom have the same meaning. They refer to lands specifically owned by the King, the origination being 'Cyne-tun', - the kings lands. As Berkshire is known as Royal Berkshire and Kensington (London), the Royal Borough, the translation cannot really be doubted. However these 'tuns' were most probably hunting grounds, certainly they had little gainful use in any modern sense, but this is quite interesting as it suggests that people who now hold the surname were probably all originally royal officials or servants. What is beyond argument is that these 'places' were amongst the earliest ever recorded being found as Chenitun (Berkshire) in the Anglo-Saxon chronicles of the year 821, Chenetune (Surrey) in the 1086 Domesday Book, and Chintun (Kent) in the register of Canterbury Cathedral for 1072. The surname is later and example include Walter de Keninton of Oxford in 1273, Reginald de Kensington, of Norfolk, also in 1273, Alice Kennington of Westminster on December 9th 1635, and Elzabeth Kenington, also recorded as Kennington, at St Botolphs without Aldgate, London, on November 29th 1663. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ivo de Kenington, which was dated 1272, the Hundred rolls of the county of Suffolk, during the reign of King Edward 1st, known as 'The hammer of the Scots,' 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
© Copyright: Name Orgin Research surname database 1980 - 2009